resources for @GitHub n00bs (small list, please add)

I started posting data from papers to Dryad and elsewhere a while back, but I finally made a commitment too start posting the code used to manipulate, analyze, and plot the data as well. Since my code generally sucks (meaning it can be is inefficient and ugly), I thought I would post to GitHub instead of as a text file in the paper’s online supplement to allow others to improve it if they want to use it.  My first attempt is here; this follows an earlier posting of the java code for a smartphone guide to the trees of the UF campus. Please don’t mock the n00b.

I’ve used some version control platforms before as part of a collaboration with another group, but there is definitely a learning curve. After posting a request on twitter for some suggestions I heard mainly crickets, but here are two places people suggested a newcomer to GitHub could go to learn to use it. [Edit: also go check out the suggestions in this post at Dynamic Ecology]

Thanks to @noamross, @MinorityPostdoc, @recology_, Sean Hoban, and @JennyBryan for the suggestions. If you know of any others, please post in the comments and I will add them.

 

PS the Code for the smartphone app featured in the cover photo is also posted to GitHub.

One thought on “resources for @GitHub n00bs (small list, please add)

  1. Meghan Duffy

    As I struggled with RStudio and github today, I got these links via twitter:
    https://github.com/microbialinformatics/assignment01 (Written by Pat Schloss; this one is the one that solved my problem of trying to get RStudio and github to talk)
    http://stat545-ubc.github.io/git00_index.html (by Jenny Bryan; I also found this one particularly helpful)
    http://r-pkgs.had.co.nz/git.html (by Hadley Wickham)
    https://help.github.com/articles/adding-a-remote/
    https://marklodato.github.io/visual-git-guide/index-en.html

So what do you think?

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